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  It Is Well With Me, Why Dost Thou Weep,
As Thou Saw Thy Lov’d One In His Last Long Sleep.
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~ Beautiful Epitaphs
 

Proctor DNA Project   




 

Military Veterans


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Air Medal
Air Medal
The Air Medal was established by Executive Order 9158, signed by Franklin D. Roosevelt, on 11 May 1942. The Air Medal was awarded retroactive to 8 September 1939. The medal is awarded to anyone who, while serving in any capacity in or with the Armed Forces of the United States, distinguishes himself or herself by meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flight. 
 
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Aircrew Badge
Aircrew Badge
The Aircrew Badge, commonly known as Wings, is a qualification badge of the United States military that is awarded by all five branches of armed services to personnel who serve as crew members on board military aircraft. The badge is intended to recognize the training and qualifications required by aircrew of military aircraft. In order to qualify as an aircrew member and receive the Aircrew Badge, such personnel typically undergo advanced training in aircraft in-flight support roles. 
 
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American Campaign Medal
American Campaign Medal
The American Campaign Medal was established per Executive Order 9265,6 November 1942, by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and announced in War Department Bulletin 56, 1942. The criteria was initially announced in Department of the Army (DA) Circular 1, dated 1 January 1943, so that the ribbon could be authorized prior to design of the medal. The criteria for the medal was announced in DA Circular 84, dated 25 March 1948 and subsequently published in Army Regulation 600-65, dated 22 September 1948. The American Campaign Medal was issued as a service ribbon only during the Second World War, and wasn't issued as a full-sized medal until 1947.

The first recipient of the American Campaign Medal was General of the Army George C. Marshall, Jr.[
 
 
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American Defense Service Medal
American Defense Service Medal
The American Defense Service Medal was established by Executive Order 8808, on 28 June 1941, by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and announced in War Department Bulletin 17, 1941. The criteria for the medal was announced in Department of the Army Circular 44, on 13 February 1942. The service ribbon design was approved by the Secretary of War and the Secretary of Navy on January 7, 1942. The medal was designed by Mr. Lee Lawrie, a civilian sculptor from Easton, Maryland. The model was approved by the Commission of Fine Arts on May 5, 1942.

The medal is authorized to military members who served on active duty between September 8, 1939 and December 7, 1941. Members of the United States Army, to include those in the Army Reserve and Army National Guard, received this medal for any length of service during the eligibility period, provided that they were on orders to active duty for a period of twelve months or longer.[1] The United States Navy excluded those Reservists who were on active duty for less than ten days during the eligibility period, but otherwise the Navy, United States Marine Corps, and United States Coast Guard awarded the medal to all personnel who served on active duty at any time during the eligibility period, provided they passed their initial physical examinations, such as in the case of those Reservists called back to extended active duty prior to the December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, or those enlisted recruits and officer candidates accessed during the same period.[
 
 
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American Revolutionary War Veteran
American Revolutionary War Veteran
1775-1783 English Colonists vs. Great Britain
~
American Revolution 
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Army of Occupation Medal
Army of Occupation Medal
The Army of Occupation Medal is a military award of the United States military which was established by the United States War Department on 5 April 1946.[2] The medal was created in the aftermath of the Second World War to recognize those who had performed occupation service in either Germany, Italy, Austria, or Japan. [3] The original Army of Occupation Medal was intended only for members of the United States Army, but was expanded in 1948 to encompass the United States Air Force shortly after that service's creation. The Navy and Marine equivalent of the Army of Occupation Medal is the Navy Occupation Service Medal. 
 
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Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal is a military award of the Second World War. It was awarded to any member of the United States Military who served in the Pacific Theater from 1941 to 1945 and was created on November 6, 1942 by Executive Order 9265 issued by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The medal was designed by Thomas Hudson Jones. The reverse side was designed by Adolph Alexander Weinman and is the same design as used on the reverse of the European-African-Middle Eastern and American Campaign Medals.

There were 21 Army and 48 Navy/Marine official campaigns of the Pacific Theater, denoted on the service ribbon by campaign stars; some construction battalion units issued the medal with Arabic numerals. The Arrowhead device is authorized for those campaigns which involved participation in amphibious assault landings. The Fleet Marine Force Combat Operation Insignia is also authorized for wear on the medal for Sailors who participated in combat while assigned to the Marine Corps. The flag colors of Japan and the United States are visible in the ribbon.

The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was first issued as a service ribbon in 1941. A full medal was authorized in 1947, the first of which was presented to General of the Army Douglas MacArthur. The European Theater equivalent of the medal was known as the European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal.
 
 
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Bay of Pigs Invasion Veteran
Bay of Pigs Invasion Veteran
1961 United States vs. Cuba 
 
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Bronze Star Medal
Bronze Star Medal
The Bronze Star Medal (popularly though incorrectly referred to as the Bronze Star) is a United States decoration awarded to members of the United States Armed Forces for acts of heroism, meritorious achievement, or meritorious service in a combat zone. When awarded for acts of heroism, the medal is authorized to be worn with the "V" Device or Combat "V" for valor. 
 
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Cherokee War Veteran
Cherokee War Veteran
1759-1761 English Colonists vs. Cherokee Indians 
 
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Civil War Veteran ~ Confederate States of America
Civil War Veteran ~ Confederate States of America
1861-1865
~
American Civil War
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Civil War Veteran ~ Union - United States of America
Civil War Veteran ~ Union - United States of America
1861-1865
~
American Civil War
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Coast Artilley Corps Veteran
Coast Artilley Corps Veteran
The U.S. Army Coast Artillery Corps (CAC) was a corps level organization responsible for coastal, harbor, and anti-aircraft defense of the United States between 1901 and 1950. The CAC also operated heavy and railway artillery during World War I.

Motto: "Defendimus" (We Defend).
 
 
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Combat Action Ribbon
Combat Action Ribbon
The Combat Action Ribbon (CAR) is a personal decoration of the United States Department of the Navy and U.S. Coast Guard that may be awarded to those who, in any grade including and below that of a Captain in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard (or Colonel in the U.S. Marine Corps), have actively participated in ground or surface combat. 
 
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Combat Infantryman Badge
Combat Infantryman Badge
The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is a United States Army military award. The badge is awarded to infantrymen and Special Forces soldiers in the rank of Colonel and below, who personally fought in active ground combat while assigned as members of either an infantry, Ranger or Special Forces unit, of brigade size or smaller, any time after 6 December 1941. The CIB and its non-combat contemporary, the Expert Infantryman Badge (EIB) were simultaneously created during World War II to enhance the morale and prestige of service in the infantry. Specifically, it recognizes the inherent sacrifices of all infantrymen, and that, in comparison to all other military occupational specialties, infantrymen face the greatest risk of being wounded or killed in action. 
 
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Combat Medical Badge
Combat Medical Badge
The Combat Medical Badge is an award of the United States Army which was first created in January 1945. Any member of the Army Medical Department, at the rank of Colonel or below, who is assigned or attached to a ground Combat Arms unit of brigade or smaller size which provides medical support during any period in which the unit was engaged in active ground combat is eligible for the CMB. According to the award criterion, the individual must be performing medical duties while simultaneously being actively engaged by the enemy; strict adherence to this requirement and its interpretation (e.g., distant mortar rounds vs. direct small arms fire) will vary by unit. As of 3 June 2005, Special Forces medics are no longer eligible for award, but may now receive the Combat Infantryman Badge.[2] A revision has allowed aviation medics to be eligible for the CMB.[3] The non-combat proficiency equivalent is the Expert Field Medical Badge.

The Combat Medical Badge is retroactive to 6 December 1941. The original decoration was considered a one-time decoration, however this directive was rescinded in 1951 allowing for multiple awards of the Combat Medical Badge denoted by stars encircling the decoration.[4] According to the US Army Medical Department Regiment, to date there have been only two Soldiers that have earned the Combat Medical Badge with two stars: Henry Jenkins and Wayne Slagel.[5] The directive was again altered in 1969 to specify that only one award of the Combat Medical Badge is authorized for service in Vietnam, Laos, the Dominican Republic, South Korea (subsequent to 4 January 1969), El Salvador, Grenada, Panama, Southwest Asia, Somalia, Iraq, and Afghanistan regardless of whether an individual has served in one or more of these areas.

In 1947, a policy was implemented that authorized the retroactive award of the Bronze Star to soldiers who had received the Combat Medical badge during the Second World War. The basis for doing this was that the Combat Medical Badge was awarded only to soldiers who had borne combat duties befitting the Bronze Star Medal and also that both awards required a recommendation by the commander and a citation in orders.
 
 
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Confederate States Ship Pee Dee
Confederate States Ship Pee Dee
Photo Credit: 290 Foundation 
 
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Creek War Veteran
Creek War Veteran
1813-1814 United States vs. Creek Indians 
 

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